MRI scan of the human brainNeuroscientists working directly for supporters of Britain staying in the EU have come up with a way to ensure that the referendum goes the “right way” in June.

Private studies of social media have revealed how it is possible to use short messages to implant false memories into people. One of the scientists involved, Frank Oliver O’Leary, has decided to speak out because he feels that people have the right to know what is going on. Mr O’Leary contacted me directly as he feels this is an abuse of Internet Psychology.

The plan is to use the technique he helped develop called “Applying Prior Recall Inside Lobes”. This is where social media is used to implant memories directly into the Temporal Lobe of the brain, which is crucial in memory formation. The technique triggers a series of psychological events within our brains that convinces us that we can recall something, even if it has not happened.

Some supporters of Britain remaining in the EU apparently plan to use the technique to implant positive, but false memories, of the wonders of Europe into the brains of social media users.

With so many people then having seemingly real memories of the positive benefits of the EU, it is thought that the referendum vote to remain will be overwhelming. Brexit itself will make an exit, so the supporters of “Applying Prior Recall Inside Lobes” believe.

Frank Oliver O’Leary said: “This kind of technique is dangerous. Who knows what it could be used for in the future? This April sees us just a couple of months away from the referendum, so we need to act now to stop these fools using this technique.”

To find out more about Applying Prior Recall Inside Lobes, you can click here.


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